FAQ

For many people they do work.

I went through one and got my first job as a software engineer. But I also had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to it.

IMO most bootcamps are over selling what people can do.

They really only work for people that have some experience leading into it and just need that final boost to land their first job.

And if that is all you need, that final boost, there are better options out there. Reach out if you’d like any further info, I’m happy to help. 😊

 

I asked the same question back in 2017 when I went through one.

People are still going through them and getting jobs.

I got my first job as a software engineer by going through a bootcamp.  On the side though, I’d been working on projects for the three years prior.

I believe many bootcamps are overestimating what they can help people do. If you have some prior experience leading into it, they may work for you.  For those looking for that final boost to land their first job, then it could be the key…

However, I can think of some better options for you. If you’d like more advice, reach out. I’m here to help! 😊

 

Realistically… A lot try and sell the Zero to Full stack developer idea.

But from my personal experience going through one this is setting beginners up for failure.

I had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to my bootcamp.

Most bootcamps seem to over sell what people can do. They really only work if you’ve got prior experience, and you are not at the beginner stage.

Best to spend some time learning and working on a personal project to get a sense of what you like about coding. That will help you work out your ideal career choice.  Reach out if you want some more info… happy to help.

 

Only if you get a job 😀

For me it did, I went through one and got my first job as a software engineer. But I also had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to it.

IMO there are other options with a better ROI.  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, bootcamps are great if you have already got a lot of knowledge and just need that final boost.  Most of them can’t help you if you are just a beginner. Reach out if you want to know more

 

Yes, but usually it is because that bootcamp grad has more experience than just the bootcamp.

Like for me for example, I had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to the bootcamp I went through.

Really, in my opinion you need to have some experience leading into a bootcamp to get the most out of it. I personally think there are better ways. Reach out if you’d like to know more.

 

It varies a lot based on company, role, and area.

If you are in a city in the US like Boston or SF, entry level coders can easily find $100k jobs.

My first job 4 years ago was $90k in the Boston area but now it would have been $100k.

More rural areas will most likely be lower due to cost of living unless you are working remotely and the company pays a flat rate regardless of location.

I would recommend checking out glassdoor to get specifics on your area and the type of company you might want to work for.

Let me know if I can help you further. 😊 

 

💯

Basically every single industry has software needs now so every single industry needs coders.

It is one of the few skills that is in demand everywhere. If you like cars, be a coder in the auto industry, like healthcare, be a coder in the healthcare space.

Don’t see anything you like? Build it yourself! Your options are really limitless. 

Reach out if you want to know more… Happy to help!

 

Yes and no.

As a hiring manager and a previous bootcamp grad I have a pretty clear idea of what works.

If someone treats a bootcamp as their only coding experience, they are going to have a really hard time finding a job.

Bootcamps aren’t like college degrees.

CS grads can lean on their degree to get a job. Bootcamp grads need other stuff on their resume to get a job.

For me, I had worked on a personal project for close to 3 years and listed that experience as I was able to talk in detail about how I built it, how I tried to get people to use it, the things I learn etc.

That project was way more involved than most bootcamp portfolio projects. 

Let me know if you want to know more… happy to help.

 

💯

Every industry these days has software needs.  This means every single industry needs programmers.

It’s one of the few skills that are in high demand, not just in some places, but everywhere.

This means that whatever you are into, there’s a job for you. Like cars? Great, go get a job at an automotive manufacturer. Into healthcare – there’s a job waiting for you.

Don’t see anything you like? Build it yourself! Your options are really limitless. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

Only as stressful as any other job.

It really depends on the team and you.

Every job has stress, and everyone has stress in their life.

How you look at that stress is what is important.

If you look at stress in a positive way,

that stress will make you better and you will be thankful for it. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

Really nothing.

Some people might view coding as more high-level beginner language.

If someone codes they might just be playing around.

If someone programs, they are lower-level, thinking about architecture and data structures. 

But with all that said, if someone gives you a hard time because you like to use coding vs programming, they are probably holding onto some baggage of their own, so ignore them. 😀 

I’m an engineering manager and I use coding language way more than programming language. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

With just HTML and CSS you are looking more at UX/UI design.

Doing mockups, wire framing, etc.

So if you are more artistic than this could be a good option for you. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

For many people they are.

I went through one and got my first job as a software engineer.

But I also had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to it.

IMO most bootcamps are over selling what people can do and

really only work for people that have some experience leading into it

They are good for those who just need that final boost to land their first job.

And if that is all you need, that final boost, there are other better options out there.

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

Typically IT bootcamps are focused more on IT systems like networking, server management, etc.

My brother actually works for one called Merit America.

The curriculum is pretty different from a coding bootcamp where you would learn programming concepts. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

They typically range from 2-3 months and can be either full time or part time.

Most are in the 3 month range and require you to be full time.

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

For many people they are, and with the huge increase in remote work, having the experience of working with others remotely online is beneficial.

I went through a bootcamp but it was in person.

I think the biggest thing to think about with an online bootcamp is what your community and support system looks like.

Having the right community, support system, and mentorship is hugely important when learning to code. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

CNBC reported back in 2019 that the average person spends over $15,000 transitioning into coding.

Some offer deferred payments or other sorts of payment plans, but chances are you are spending at least $12,000.

That doesn’t include the opportunity cost of quitting your current job to attend the bootcamp full time.

This is another reason why I think bootcamps aren’t a great fit for a lot of people.

There are ways to make the transition that are cheaper and more effective in the long run. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

They are all the same really.

It is the effort you put in and the career clarity that you have that matters most.

If you have both of those, you honestly don’t need a bootcamp.

You’re going to be successful regardless. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

They are all the same really.

The difference maker is you.

If you treat a coding bootcamp as the only thing that you need to get a job, it doesn’t matter which one you go to, it won’t work.

Whether you go through a bootcamp or not, that is just one piece of the puzzle on your journey to becoming a developer. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

Yes, and many people do get jobs after a bootcamp.

I went through one and got my first job as a software engineer.

But I also had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to it.

IMO most bootcamps are over selling what people can do and really only work for people that have some experience leading into it. If you just need that final boost to land their first job, they are a little more useful. But, if that is all you need, that final boost, there are other better options available.

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

With any field, the higher you are on the org chart the higher your salary.

For coding, this is typically the CTO.

Their salaries will vary based on the company. 

But if you are asking about Full Stack vs Devops vs Software Engineer then

typically software engineer roles have a slightly higher salary than Devops, or QA, or Frontend Developer, for example. 

My recommendation is to worry less about the salary,

because any one of those positions can start in the $100k range and progress in the high 6 figure range over your career.

It is better to figure out which one is the most interesting to you, as that is the one that you will excel at which will result in promotions and those even higher salaries. 

If I can help you further, let me know. 😊

 

With any field, the higher you are on the org chart the higher your salary. For coding, this is typically the CTO, their salaries will vary based on the company. 

But if you are asking about Full Stack vs Devops vs Software Engineer then typically software engineer roles have a slightly higher salary than Devops, or QA, or Frontend Developer, for example. 

My recommendation is to worry less about the salary, because any one of those positions can start in the $100k range and progress in the high 6 figure range over your career. It is better to figure out which one is the most interesting to you, as that is the one that you will excel at which will result in promotions and those even higher salaries.

Most bootcamps do the same thing, so it comes down to which one fits your needs in terms of time requirement and cost. There are definitely other options besides bootcamps that you can consider.

Typically a 3 month intensive program that teaches some sort of full stack development curriculum. 

A career coach helps you reach your goals, whatever they might be.

This is where there is a little bit of buyer psychology at play. Your first thought might be to look for the cheapest option to test the waters. But the fact that it is cheap, will lower your commitment level, and therefore make it a less successful experience. Find a coach that charges a premium, as that will force you to be more committed and therefore force greater results. 

The biggest thing is finding a coach that resonates with you. Then if you are ready and willing to do the work, that is all you need to do to prepare. 

Many coaches will help you determine this based on your conversations with them.

You need to be coachable, willing to get out of your comfort zone, and take action. 

By treating them as a valuable resource. They want to help, but they can’t read your mind. Talk to them, tell them what you are thinking, what your goals are so that they can help you achieve them!

It really depends on the coach. Usually it involves some 1:1 and/or group coaching sessions as well as some self directed course work.

All types. Career clarity, interview prep, mindset work, etc.

You should look for someone that has done the thing you are looking to do. I’ve used coaches to help with my career and found people that have reach the goals I am trying to reach. 

For example, I coach people to become software developers because I myself made the career change into software development.

As much as you can! They are a resource and want to help, but they can’t read your mind. They want you to talk to them, tell them what you are thinking, what your goals are so that they can help you achieve them!

It really depends, but generally they ask questions that challenge your current way of thinking in order to stimulate growth.

They help you reach your goals.

A career coach should cost enough that it forces a commitment on your end. This is where there is a little bit of buyer psychology at play. Your first thought might be to look for the cheapest option to test the waters. But the fact that it is cheap, will lower your commitment level, and therefore make it a less successful experience. Find a coach that charges a premium, as that will force you to be more committed and therefore force greater results. 

Everything! They are a resource and want to help, but they can’t read your mind. They want you to talk to them, tell them what you are thinking, what your goals are so that they can help you achieve them!

Career coach pricing can vary a lot. But this is where there is a little bit of buyer psychology at play. Your first thought might be to look for the cheapest option to test the waters. But the fact that it is cheap, will lower your commitment level, and therefore make it a less successful experience. Find a coach that charges a premium, as that will force you to be more committed and therefore force greater results. 

Yes, having a counselor, coach, or mentor can be a huge benefit in terms of your career success.

Bootcamp refers to a program that typically teaches a full stack developer curriculum.

In terms of a resume builder, a degree is probably better. In terms of time commitment, a bootcamp is probably better.
If you are mid career and looking to learn coding, there are other even better options for you to consider. 

Yes and no, and many people do get jobs after a bootcamp. I went through one and got my first job as a software engineer. But I also had been working on side projects for 3 years leading up to it. IMO most bootcamps are over selling what people can do and really only work for people that have some experience leading into it and just need that final boost to land their first job. And if that is all you need, that final boost, there are other better options I think.

Coding bootcamps can be quite challenging for a number of reasons. The main one being simply trying to manage your time with everything that is being thrown at you. All the new information, career work, networking, personal projects, etc. 

One option that worked for me is to find a “Complete Javascript Bootcamp” type course on Udemy. Udemy is often running sales so if you keep an eye out you can probably jump on a sale and get a course that is normally a couple hundred bucks for like $15. These are nice because they usually give nice tutorials of projects at the end.

Then from there, think of a fun idea and start working on a personal project. Going from courses to working on something from scratch is super important.

It is best to be language agnostic. Pick a language to start, go through some tutorials, then pick a new language. This will help you better understand programming fundamentals. 

It’s like understanding how to hammer a nail vs understanding how to connect two pieces of wood. If you understand what it takes to connect two pieces of wood you can figure out the best option. If you only know how to hammer a nail that is all you will ever do.